DAY 5 FA CUP 3rd ROUND: CONSEQUENCES v GOOD INTENTIONS

We have received a report from today’s early kick off,  one of the most intriguing fixtures of the round.  Consequences were playing at home, and after the exertions of the first 4 days of Janathon they were the hot favorites.  Surely 3 Parkruns on Day 1, plus the other activities over the next 3 days meant today’s fixture would be a challenge too far for Good Intentions?

The game didn’t start well for the away team.  Woken at 4.30 and unable to get back to sleep until minutes before the alarm went off at 7.30 gave Consequences a very early 1-0 lead.  Then straight from the kick off the lead was doubled.  Poor tactics produced an own goal, when the dry socks and trainers fall out of the bag only a few metres into the warm up run to the Park.

Surely things couldn’t get any worse?  But they did.  It was quickly 3-0 as Good Intentions were clearly finding it very hard going such that even the small incline near Upper Warlingham Station proved difficult to run up.

But at Riddlesdown it was clear the conditions had improved over the previous 5 runs, and this lucky deflection pulled a goal back.  But the beginning of a famous comeback was quickly snuffed out; a couple of hundred metres into the Parkrun it was clear that a diminutive runner, with number 10 on his back, was using Good Intentions as a pacemaker.  Everytime Good Intentions  tried to move away from him he was back there running alongside.  Could he be the new Messi, Ronaldinho, Pele, Puskas (that shows my age, I named my rabbit after him) or Jimmy Greaves.  No, of course not, it was just showing he had completed (at least) 10 Parkruns; but actually it could also have been his age.  This young prodigy slipped the ball under an advancing keeper to put Consequences 4-1 up.

But on the stroke of half time/way, totally against the run of the play, Good Intentions scored a brilliant goal but totally unexpected goal.  When the timer read out the figures amazingly it was clear that they were only just over half over that needed for a PB if maintained.  No one saw this coming as it hit the back of the net.

Buoyed by this news Good Intentions took control in the second half of the game/run.  Runners ahead were targeted and felled with some deadly but fair challenges, pulling it back to 4-3.  Not daring to look at the watch as the 90 minutes (otherwise known as the finishing line) approached, a strong run and stunning finish saw the ball fly into the top corner giving the keeper (of the records) no chance/choice other than to declare PB.

So now the game was into ‘injury’ time.  What to do?  Should Good Intentions defend what they had fought hard to achieve, or go all out for the win, so avoiding a replay.  The ‘good intention’  had been to run home via a much long route, not just returning straight home along the normal 4k.  The brain of the team made the decision.  Go for it.  The new trainers were in the bag with clean, dry socks,  so a quick substitution was made and it was game on.  Most of the route was slightly downhill or flat, and the first goal came from a piece of generosity from d(r)ive(r).  The red lights at the crossing of the A22 changed and the stream of traffic would have meant a couple of minutes hold up in play.  The referee was fooled and the resulting penalty swiftly tucked away.

Consequences were crushed, it was so unfair.  They had been on top for most of the game but Good Intentions were rampant.  The final stretch was no contest, Consequences’  defense was torn to shreds and a outrageous finish from 5km out sealed a famous victory for Good Intentions.

What next for this team? Of course they are looking forward to dispatching Dryathon to where it deserves in the very near future.

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One response

  1. Great post and a novel way to blog about running. Definitely a game of two halves.

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